Large Indian Civet, recorded by Mithila Wildlife Trust (MWT) in Dhanusha, Province-2, Nepal

The nature never fails to amaze us by its infinite beauty. Another IUCN Red Listed animal since 2008, the Large Indian civet is also captured by Mithila Wildlife Trust at the Bhatighadi Community Forest by a camera trap.

 

Video footage of Camera Trap by Mithila Wildlife Trust

The Large Indian civet is scientifically known as (Viverra zibethanative). It is native to South and Southeast Asia. The large Indian civet inhabits scrub, grasslands, and densely forested areas in (India, Nepal, Bhutan, southern China, and Bangladesh). There are black spots on its body and stripes of black and white on the sides of which have a large body with gray or brown color. Its tail has several black rings around it. Breeding takes place at any time of the year. Litters are born in very dense vegetation or in a hole in the ground. Young are able to open their eyes within ten days. Mothers raise their young on their own. The males are slightly bigger than the females.

This species uses a wide variety of wooded habitats, both evergreen and deciduous, as well as grasslands, scrub-land, and plantations. It is often found near human habitation. large Indian civets are carnivorous, preying on birds, frogs, snakes, chickens, hens, and small mammals. They also eat fruit, eggs, roots, fish, and crabs.

It lives in a hole in the ground that another animal has dug.  They travel extensively, average daily and monthly distances estimated as being from 1.7 km to 5.4 s.

The Large Indian civet is also captured by Mithila Wildlife Trust at the Bhatighadi Community Forest by a camera trap.

 

 

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